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Old 01-05-2012, 06:54 PM   #1
JoeD
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Default I often wonder

I often wonder if I were to start all over again, turn back the clock 11 years but this time having the ability to know what I know now being a slightly smarter 25 year old, than a CLUELESS 14 year old weight lifter. I wonder how much further along than I am now, if I just did this:


1. Do the exercises that I SHOULD do, not the exercises I want to do.

I have had a front squat harness since 08 and a string ray device (to do front squats with since 07) but yet, since front squats are so much harder and a pain in the ass it took me a long time to finally man up and add these in my workouts... It doesn't take long to realize how awesome of a squat they are once you do them though, and if you need visual proof just look at a 175 lb olympic lifter's leg development

I have also had fat gripz (two pieces of solid rubber hat can turn any barbell or DB into a thick bar) since they came out, but it was only until 6 months ago where I really started to add them in. Granted thick bar training wouldve been impossible for me 11 years ago as fat gripz weren't around, or to my knowledge anything like them, but I often wonder if I did anywhere fro 40-60% of my work with thick training where my development would be. I simply didn't train with them because they were too hard.

It doesn't stop there though, I wonder what my strength and muscle development would be like if I did more pauses and harder exercises than just focus on ones I was good at. I remember Louie Simmons giving me advice saying in order to build some brute strength really fast, do hard exercises...And not front squats with chains on a swiss ball either, one exercises he mentioned was to sit back as far as I could in a sumo stance and try and deadlift that way or a bit... Or when doing rack deads, shrug the bar first and then attempt the pull... Etc..

Even doing exercises with more ROM and slowing down the negative probably would've accelerated my development too. Not that partials don't have their place because they do, and especially if you're trying to build strength, but I think if I made the majority of my lifts really hard in multiple different ways, I would be better.

2. Focus Better on Nutrition -

The last time in recent memory that I have gotten as much as the sniffles was in December 20010. I attribute that to having better nutrition. I'm not saying eat like a organic vegan yoga instructor either, but make sure no matter what diet you decide to do, that it's very nutrient dense and you're getting enough vitamin d3, mag/zinc, and your omega 3s.. Oh and plenty of veggies and fruits too. The way I see it, the more nutrients you have in your body, the better it's going to run. You can't train when you're sick, you can't grow when you're sick, you body needs essential nurients to run probably, and if you need to be medicated then you are really damaging your bodies ability to perform optimally...

Two studies here that really drive my point home. One was in Japan on obese women. One group took a multivitamin, one took a calcium pill and the other group took nothing, a placebo. They were all given diet and exercise routines but the group that did significantly better was the multi vitamin group. What wasn't clear was the exact mechanism why but it can be theorized that the multi-vitamin group had more nutrition than the others (remember, all 3 groups were obese, so all 3 were all likely starting out with very little nutrients)

The second was on the brain of 80++ year olds that was published very recently. The long and the short is the group that had the highest levels of nutrients tested, and omega 3s scored much better on cognition tests and had much more brain volume. The nutritionally misfortune group, who also ingested more trans fats scored very poor on the tests , and had significantly less brain volume. The take home message to me was the more nutrients = the better your body works and likely the better gains and everything else.

If I were to take it back I would eat way more veggies, fruits, ditch the gluten because I'm sensitive, take a quality omega 3, MV, MAG/zinc and D3 supplement. Just get more nutrients so my body runs a lot better basically..I also would not have relied on LOTS and LOTS of shakes at various points in life. Would my body comp be a lot better? Strength gains come a little easier not over eating crap? Be bigger? Workouts be better? I would think so, but who knows.

3. Perform WAY WAY WAY more pre-hab/stretching work.

Remember when I said I didn't get sick in all of 2011? Woohoo for me, but I could probably call 2011 the year of the injury bug. Nothing serious, but to stop progress in certain lifts. Can't train when you're injured and it's probably the most annoying thing on the planet to be injured.

Ask anyone on here who has been lifting a long time, they have probably gotten injured and have goals set back. We have all imagined where we would be if we were a little smarter about stretching and myofascial release techniques (foam roller, ART, rolfing, etc, tennis ball, etc)

I couldn't have afforded a steady rolfing practitioner up until a few yeras ago, but I do wonder if I wasn't so lazy with stretching and doing my own self myofascial release techniques how much better off I would be without all the lost time. I lost 9 months to lower body training in one injury alone.

Any good strength coach will preach the importance of pre-hab work. If you ever get a chance to visit Westside Barbell you'll see Louie Simmons doing some sort of prehab work just about every day for a good half hour or more. Since he literally broke/tore everything, it's the only way he can continuously train at his old age.

Also would be interesting to hear what everyone else has to say about what they wish they could've done back then, knowing what they know now.
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Old 01-05-2012, 07:14 PM   #2
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Definitely take the compound lift approach. Take my time learning to squat, deadlift, and bench properly. Then add cleans. 5x5 it all the way and stop with the crappy magazine routines.

Waste less money on useless supps and muscle rags and spend it on quality food instead.
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Old 01-05-2012, 09:10 PM   #3
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I worked out 3-4 times with a friend when I was in my mid-teens. I quickly got out of that and didn't pick it up for real until I was 18. Had I really started at age 14-15 and did so by utilizing what I know now, the difference may be amazing. Ah well.
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Old 01-06-2012, 02:20 AM   #4
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well following structured workout would do wonders for me if i could i would do it, another thing is ...i would start benching and pressing, as when i started i didn't do any pressing exercises just irregural hack squats with the bar , rowing / pull ups.
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Old 01-07-2012, 03:21 AM   #5
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Thanks for reminding me to add the fatgripz to my workout!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I bought them like 3 years ago and used them once or twice, but from now on I'm gonna start using them!

What exercises should I do them on?

Thanks.
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Old 01-07-2012, 09:51 AM   #6
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I use them on curling and pressing exercises. Although I bought a thick V handle from strength and power and a thick D hnadle from him also for rows. A cycle (6 workouts) should make you 10-15% stronger on the 1 1/4 inch DBs/BBs.. I tested that claim on one arm over head presses and it was close, about 10% in strength gains.
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Old 01-07-2012, 10:01 AM   #7
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Just got around to reading this - Good stuff Joe.

Quote:
1. Do the exercises that I SHOULD do, not the exercises I want to do.
This is something I want to talk about for a moment. Most trainees that want to try out a WSB program to increase their big three often fall into the "Pit of Despair". What do I mean? Specifically, they do not submit themselves fully over to the concepts. Look around the boards and you'll see trainees doing a WSB routine, but still put in all the bodybuilding friendly work. Most prevelant among them would be doing a max effort exercise followed by 3-4 sets of 8-10 reps DB pressing before going back to the WSB. Why? They will try to justify their choice by saying they're raw or they're working the bottom of the press lol. The reality is that they want to straddle the fence so to speak and get some hypertrophy training going for their chest. Or doing some sets of 15-20 leg pressing after DE work. Instead, what they should be doing is hammering triceps after benching or some sort of pulling variation after squatting.

This is why I came up with my thread about a strategic compromise. I believe the trainees that will end up kicking the most ass are the ones that view their routine in terms of exercises not body parts. Now the focus turns entirely over to progression and viola.

In addition to #3 I would place a premium on muscle imbalances and analysis of execution particularly w/ the squats and deads.. I've done A LOT of rock bottom raw paused squats w/ a narrow stance (I'm talking feet literally about a foot apart). One thing I've noticed myself doing in the past after review is that I was relaxing for a moment to "rest" on my calves. Even with my normal heavier (430 - 455+ range) full squats was losing tension on my calves. In watching my vids, I was able to maintain a level of objectivity and essentially reset my weights back to 405 and work to get rid of those bad habits. If you don't, they will end up biting you in the ass in terms of halting progression or worse yet causing an injury.
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Old 01-07-2012, 02:51 PM   #8
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Good read Joe - can you expand a little on the fat grip thing? Never heard of that before..
And I hate to warm up
DH - I'll check out your link in a bit.
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Old 01-07-2012, 05:27 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hayabusa3 View Post
Good read Joe - can you expand a little on the fat grip thing? Never heard of that before..
And I hate to warm up
DH - I'll check out your link in a bit.
You really only find fat gripz or thick bars in strongman/powerlifting or gyms that cater to athletes

Here's the 3 benefits

a) They really train your grip/forearms/wrists
b) They recruit more motor units (making you bigger/stronger faster).. Hence being 10% stronger when going back to your standard bar/db training
c) They are more "functional" meaning in real life and in sports you are going to grab things that are a lot thicker/wider than a 1 and 1/4 inch bar. Therefore training with them will transfer better to athletic or out of the gym endeavors better


www.fatgripz.com

They are tough at first, but stick with them. A cycle of them should make you about 10% or more stronger when you start training with standard 1 1/4 inch bars again.
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Old 01-07-2012, 05:35 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkhorse View Post
Just got around to reading this - Good stuff Joe.

This is something I want to talk about for a moment. Most trainees that want to try out a WSB program to increase their big three often fall into the "Pit of Despair". What do I mean? Specifically, they do not submit themselves fully over to the concepts. Look around the boards and you'll see trainees doing a WSB routine, but still put in all the bodybuilding friendly work. Most prevelant among them would be doing a max effort exercise followed by 3-4 sets of 8-10 reps DB pressing before going back to the WSB. Why? They will try to justify their choice by saying they're raw or they're working the bottom of the press lol. The reality is that they want to straddle the fence so to speak and get some hypertrophy training going for their chest. Or doing some sets of 15-20 leg pressing after DE work. Instead, what they should be doing is hammering triceps after benching or some sort of pulling variation after squatting.

This is why I came up with my thread about a strategic compromise. I believe the trainees that will end up kicking the most ass are the ones that view their routine in terms of exercises not body parts. Now the focus turns entirely over to progression and viola.

In addition to #3 I would place a premium on muscle imbalances and analysis of execution particularly w/ the squats and deads.. I've done A LOT of rock bottom raw paused squats w/ a narrow stance (I'm talking feet literally about a foot apart). One thing I've noticed myself doing in the past after review is that I was relaxing for a moment to "rest" on my calves. Even with my normal heavier (430 - 455+ range) full squats was losing tension on my calves. In watching my vids, I was able to maintain a level of objectivity and essentially reset my weights back to 405 and work to get rid of those bad habits. If you don't, they will end up biting you in the ass in terms of halting progression or worse yet causing an injury.
Agreed on all of that and things have bit me in the ass PLENTY of times
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Old 03-02-2012, 07:41 PM   #11
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This is a great thread. So would you recommend Fatgripz for anyone?
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Old 03-03-2012, 08:16 AM   #12
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heck yea i would
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